Karl Lagerfeld has been honoured in the most moving way in Paris

Karl Lagerfeld has been honoured in the most moving way in Paris


After Karl Lagerfeld passed away last February at the age of 85, he was honoured at his last shows during fashion month: Fendi in Milan, and Chanel in Paris.

But last night was the first time all his fashion houses came together to pay tribute to the late designer. Fendi, Chanel and his eponymous label joined forces in Paris for a 90-minute ‘Karl For Ever’ memorial.

Karl, who famously hated funerals (‘I’d rather die,’ he famously quoted), was cremated in private, so this was the opportunity for those who loved him to say farewell to him.

The event was aptly held at the Grand Palais, which Karl regularly transformed into wonderful creations for his shows, from winter wonderlands to enchanted forests and an airport.

Famous guests such as French First Lady Brigitte Macron, the royal family of Monaco, Gigi Hadid and Claudia Schiffer sat on black and white seats surrounded by black and white portraits of the designer, spanning his lifetime. A monochrome nod to Karl’s favourite colours.

Tilda Swinton, Helen Mirren and Cara Delevingne delivered readings, whilst Pharrell and concert pianist Lang Lang performed.

Then came an on-screen homage from famous figures, from Maria Grazia Chiuri to Baz Luhrmann, and even included a cameo from Karl’s beloved cat, Choupette. The video included words by Lagerfeld himself, with the help of edited clips from archive interviews.

A moving tribute about the man and his creative genius.

The post Karl Lagerfeld has been honoured in the most moving way in Paris appeared first on Marie Claire.

Why have we all stopped talking about the refugee crisis?

Why have we all stopped talking about the refugee crisis?


On World Refugee Day, Jenny Proudfoot sits down with founder and CEO of The Worldwide Tribe Jaz O’Hara for a reminder that the problem is far from over…

It has been four years since the body of a three-year-old Syrian boy, Alan Kurdi, washed up on a Turkish beach, prompting an outpouring of international concern for the refugee crisis.

Now in 2019 however, a lot of the attention has died down, with too many of us assuming that the lack of media coverage means that the problem has been solved.

This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Right now, there are 70 million individuals worldwide who have been displaced by conflict, violence or persecution, according to the UNHCR.

It remains to be the biggest humanitarian crisis of our time and it is our duty to keep talking about it.

One person who knows this all too well is social humanitarian Jaz O’Hara, CEO and founder of The Worldwide Tribe.

The online community-turned-global movement raises awareness of the refugee crisis and runs aid projects across Europe and the Middle East.

‘It began with a Facebook post,’ Jaz told me back in 2016. ‘After reading about the refugee crisis in July 2015, I jumped in my car and drove to Calais to find out what I could do to help. I was shocked by the devastation I found there, so I wrote about it on my Facebook page to share with friends and family. The next morning, it had been shared 65,000 times, reaching millions of people.

‘Within weeks I had quit my job in fashion designing for an underwear brand, and created an online movement that has rallied together hundreds of volunteers from all over the UK, filling warehouses across London with donations of food, clothing and tents. Our initial target was to raise £100 to cover travel expenses, but it became Just Giving’s biggest crowdfunding campaign ever.’

Noticing that the conversation around the refugee crisis had dried up, I caught up with Jaz this week to get some insight.

‘Since 2015/ 2016, I’ve seen a massive decrease in mainstream media coverage of the refugee crisis and general understanding and awareness,’ Jaz told me. ‘People often ask me, “Oh, there are still refugees in Calais? I thought that was over. The jungle was demolished.” But I always wonder if they think about what happened to the people. Yes, the jungle was demolished but the people are still there. They were dispersed but there’s still a real situation in Calais.

‘Less people are successfully making the journey because there are not rescue boats working in the mediterranean anymore,’ she continued. ‘Many people are still dying in the mediterranean today.’

With The Worldwide Tribe podcast launching today to further their message and spread people’s stories, I caught up with Jaz to find out why the conversation around the crisis has withered and what we can all do on an individual level to help.

Why do you think people have stopped talking about the refugee crisis?

There seems to be a bit of a fatigue. People have read about it, they have cared about it, they were talking about it, it was in the media, but now things have moved on as they do naturally. New things have come into the media, Brexit and climate change for example, and all sorts of things that seem closer to home right now are swallowing up people’s attention. What I am trying to do constantly is link these things together. Climate change for example is going to be a massive driver of an increased amount of refugees. The UN predicts that by 2050 there will be a billion refugees due to climate change so it is all part of a bigger story and it is really important to still be talking about it. Things haven’t changed.

The Worldwide Tribe

What is the most common misconception about the refugee crisis?

I think the most common misconception is that refugees are poor. I’ve met doctors, lawyers, economists, engineers etc. Often refugees are the most well off in their society because especially in Calais and in France, to get that far along your journey is pretty expensive – you have to pay people smugglers along the way, you have to have resources available to you to get that far. Refugees are not poor, they are just leaving because they’re being persecuted. They’re fleeing persecution not poverty.

What do you wish people knew about the refugee crisis?

I wish that people knew it was still ongoing. But do you know what I really wish? I wish people had a real understanding of why people were leaving their countries and making these journeys. I think we need to bring it down to basics and understand the definition of the word refugee. There is a huge difference between being an economic migrant and a refugee. My mum is an economic migrant – she moved from Holland to England, but a refugee is leaving their country because they have no choice – they are fleeing war or persecution or death in some way.

How can people help on an individual scale?

There are so many varying levels to this so it really depends on you as an individual and what you have to offer. What are your skills? What are your talents? What do you believe in? What do you enjoy doing? What is your offering? This could look like lots of things. For example, you might be a hairdresser that wants to cut hair on the ground, you might work in social media strategy and can help a group like The Worldwide Tribe with their social media strategy (because we definitely need that). You might be a yoga teacher that wants to give mindfulness or meditation offerings to people that have arrived in your own community. Even if you’re just a listening ear, there is something that each of us can do. We all have access to the same amount of time and the choice of what we do with it. We can all help in an infinite number of ways.

What inspired you to launch a podcast for The Worldwide Tribe?

I’m always looking for new ways to get these stories out there. We’ve done a lot of writing, visual photography and films, but I think podcasts really enable people to tell their story. It’s very difficult to get people to sit and watch a film for an hour – especially if you’re spreading it through social media. People don’t have the attention, but podcasts can really amplify the voices that have been previously going unheard.

What can we expect from The Worldwide Tribe’s Podcast?

You can expect to be inspired, uplifted, encouraged but also informed and educated about the situation. It will be an emotional roller coaster. You’ll travel across the world without leaving the comfort of your train seat or sofa. It will be informative and inspirational in equal measure and you will hopefully get a real insight into each of these stories – why people were leaving, what their journey was like, what happened to them, who they are as an individual and as a result of that, we will hopefully change some opinions and overturn some negative stereotypes that people might have about immigration or judgments they might hold.

The Worldwide Tribe podcast is available on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts and all the main podcast providers.

The post Why have we all stopped talking about the refugee crisis? appeared first on Marie Claire.

Why should you have to choose between being an MP and a mother?

Why should you have to choose between being an MP and a mother?


It’s 2019.

REX

Maternity rights are a highly-discussed part of the fight for gender equality – proving as a constant reminder that in the world of work, we’re not on equal footing.

This was proven once more this week, as now pregnant Labour MP for Walthamstow Stella Creasy wrote an open letter for The Guardian about her personal struggle.

‘MPs are not entitled to maternity leave,’ Stella wrote in her first person piece. ’The equality battle is far from over,’ going on to explain how no paid cover is available for work outside the House of Commons, and while changes are slowly being made, there is a need to go further.

‘Even when you’ve spent a lifetime fighting for equality, you can still be floored by the way discrimination manifests itself. I never thought parliament would tell me to choose between being an MP and being a mum.’

REX

Stella was at work the day after a miscarriage and her colleague was filing casework just days after a C-section.

‘No community should miss out on representation because its MP is pregnant – nor should my opponents be able to argue there’s a cost to my constituents because I may succeed in my quest to conceive,’ Stella’s piece for The Guardian continued. ‘For all the talk of being family friendly, Westminster is still struggling to offer deeds instead of words. And if we can’t get this right for MPs, how can we get this right for parents elsewhere?

‘Achieving a world in which women are not discriminated against because they can carry children means challenging all of these attitudes – and the policies that go with them. From the parliamentary authorities to our healthcare services and workplaces, it’s time to stop asking nicely for the discrimination to be dealt with. It is time to refuse to wait patiently and instead to make it a a priority.’

Stella concluded: ‘As a politician I’ve never stopped fighting for women to have control over their own bodies through the provision of reproductive rights and services as the non-negotiable prerequisite of equality. As a pregnant woman this recent experience is another bitter reminder that it’s still often men – this time the Ipsa executives – who will make the choices that determine if that battle will be won.’

Thank you Stella for opening the conversation.

The post Why should you have to choose between being an MP and a mother? appeared first on Marie Claire.



Cult beauty products that continue to sell out in record time

Cult beauty products that continue to sell out in record time


cult beauty products

There are some beauty products that stand the test of time, that continue to sell incredibly well year after year, with no signs of stopping. They’re the cult beauty products that are passed down through generations, from your grandmother to your mother and onwards, like the best moisturiser you’ve ever used, a hair mask that goes that extra mile or a serum so good you recommend it to everyone you meet. Alexia Inge even started a company, Cult Beauty, based on this very idea. Inge says a cult beauty product must elicit squeals of delight, ‘and exceed all our expectations (and often shift the goalposts altogether). These are the products you will. not. be. parted from – the jars you dutifully decant, the tubes you scissor open and the bottles your store upside down to ensure you don’t waste a single drop. Firm fixtures of make up artists’ kits, you’ll find these formulas jealously guarded backstage at fashion weeks and photoshoots, and also in the bathrooms of the AAA-List who choose these products for love (not money). Staggeringly efficacious, these do ‘what they say on the tin’ and then some… the only thing they will not do is disappoint.’

You know that they can be trusted, because millions of people can’t be wrong. These products amass enormous waiting lists and have staggering sales figures that will knock your socks off. The numbers just don’t lie. These are the industry’s best cult beauty buys…

Embryolisse Lait-Crème Concentré, £20 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products embryolisse

You will find one of these moisturisers in pretty much every make-up artist’s kit. It’s perfectly light, unscented and as gentle as they come. It’s so popular in fact that one of them sells every 23 seconds in the UK.

Buy Now

Avène Thermal Water, £4.50 for 50ml Look Fantastic

cult beauty products avene

A summer essential – super cooling when you’re on the beach, in the park or even on your hot commute. 50 bottles of this face mist are sold per minute around the world.

Buy Now

Estée Lauder Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex II, £55 Fabled

cult beauty products ANR

If you’ve never tried Estée Lauder’s ANR, follow the crowd and give it a bash. It was the first skincare product to use hyaluronic acid, it’s super nourishing and its popularity doesn’t seem to ever wane. Over 10 bottles of ANR are sold every minute around the world. 

Buy Now

Bioderma Sensibio H2O Make-up Removing Micelle Solution, £10.80 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products bioderma micellar water

You’ve definitely seen or tried this micellar water. Designed for sensitive skin, but works wonders on all skin types to remove the day’s make-up. One bottle of Sensibio H20 is sold every 2 seconds worldwide.

Buy Now

Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream Skin Protectant, £27 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products 8 hour cream

This thick and gooey gel is perfect for banishing dry and flaky skin and it seems that the whole world is obsessed with it. One tube is sold every 30 seconds worldwide.

Buy Now

L’Oréal Paris Elnett Satin Hairspray, £2.39 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products elnett

The original hair spray, this is definitely one that you spotted in your mother’s bathroom cabinet that you now use religiously. Incredibly, 15 cans of Elnett are sold every second, and that’s just the in the UK.

Buy Now

The Ordinary Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1% Serum, £5 Cult Beauty

cult beauty products the ordinary

There are so many bestselling products from The Ordinary; remember when they announced that their foundation was on its way and it gathered a wait list of over 25,00?! Well none of it compares to this blemish-beating serum. One of these serums sells every 6 seconds around the world.

Buy Now

Kiehl’s Ultra Facial Cream, £24.50 

cult beauty products kiehls ultra facial cream

If you want a reliable moisturiser that’s super hydrating then you really needn’t look any further than Kiehl’s Ultra Facial Cream. It seems that lots of people agree. 10 pots of Ultra Facial Cream are sold per minute around the globe. It’s by far their bestselling product.

Buy Now

Liz Earle Cleanse & Polish, £15.50 Fabled

cult beauty products cleanse and polish

You can thank Cleanse & Polish for introducing so many people to the idea of double cleansing. This is the ideal second step to remove any last scrapes of make-up and dirt. One Cleanse & Polish is sold every 15 seconds worldwide.

Buy Now

Nuxe Reve de Miel Lip Balm

Weleda Skin Food, £12.95 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products weleda skin food

There are some people who use this rich cream on their face, whilst others coat their limbs in it. Whichever camp you fall into, you’ll know that it’s exactly what it says on the tin – it’s food for you skin. 1 tube is sold every 23 seconds in the UK.

Buy Now

Trilogy Certified Organic Rosehip Oil, £19.50 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products trilogy rosehip oil

Why is this so popular? Well it’s probably because it’s been clinically tested to show that it minimises the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines, smoothes skin and boosts moisture levels. It must be that, because one is sold every 20 seconds around the world.

Buy Now

Tangle Teezer The Original Detangling Hairbrush, £9.35 Look Fantastic

cult beauty products tangle teezer

What the hell did we do before the Tangle Teezer?! It really needs no introduction. 15 Tangle Teezer hairbrushes are purchased per minute.

Buy Now

Philip Kingsley Elasticizer, £19 Cult Beauty

cult beauty products elasticizer

This hair mask was the world’s first pre-shampoo treatment created for Audrey Hepburn to give her bounce and shine after her hair had been over-styled on shoots. If it was good enough for Hepburn, it’s definitely good enough for the rest of us… Two tubs of this intense hair mask are sold every minute.

Buy Now

GHD The Original IV Styler, £88.25 Fabled

cult beauty products ghds

Ask anyone ‘what’s the best hair straightener?’ And you’ll be told GHDs straight out. They’re just that good. Four stylers are sold every minute across the globe and over 2 million are sold every year.

Buy Now

How many of the above are in your arsenal?

Any of them that you haven’t tried? Get shopping…

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It’s my job to test thousands of beauty products, but these are the ones I always go back to

It’s my job to test thousands of beauty products, but these are the ones I always go back to


I am one lucky girl, because it is my daily task to test new makeup, skincare and hair products to review here on the Marie Claire website. It’s a tough job, but someone has to do it.

There are some products that I get particularly excited about testing. For example, I cannot wait to get my hands on a good moisturiser that quenches my dry skin, so that I can consider it for our best moisturiser for dry skin article. I also can’t get enough of new fragrances that land on my desk, because who isn’t trying to find the best perfume you’ve ever smelt?

However, despite having shelves and shelves filled with the most exciting and whizzy new products, there are some products that I will never turn my back on. The ones that I go back to time after time, because they never let me down and continue to impress me after all these years.

Here are my favourite products that will forever be my go-tos…

Vichy Minéral 89 Serum, £16.50 Feelunique

vichy hyaluronic serum

I have dry skin, no matter the season, and nothing quenches my skin’s thirst like this serum. I use it as the first step in my skincare and follow with another active serum (something like a vitamin C serum). I also love the price. Anything under £20 gets my vote.

Buy Now

Glossier Lash Slick, £14

glossier mascara

All hail Lash Slick. Ever since this beauty came int0 my life last year it has changed my life. It’s a tubing mascara, so might not be to everyone’s taste, but I love the way it lengthens my lashes as well as coating each individual lash in pigment.

Buy Now

Clarins Instant Concealer, £19.12 John Lewis

clarins concealer

I have written in the past about my love for this concealer. It’s a long-standing relationship that I have nurtured for years. It never lets me down, it always covers my dark under-eye circles and it brightens my face allowing me to take on the day.

Buy Now

Lime Crime Bushy Brow Gel, £18 Cult Beauty

lime crime brow gel

It’s not so much the formula that I find so brilliant in this brow gel (don’t get me wrong, it’s excellent and lasts all day), but it’s the brush that I’m obsessed with. It’s so much longer than others that I’ve tried and always gives me that bushy, Olsen-twins, dramatic, pushed up brow that I desire.

Buy Now

Sanoflore Aciana Botanica Divine Bare Skin Make-up Remover, £17 Feelunique

sanoflore cleanser

I used to be terrified of oil-based cleansers, but quickly saw the error of my ways and am now obsessed. I will try new ones out, however you’ll always find this one in my bathroom cabinet. It starts off as a thick gel that when you work into your skin becomes an oily balm (removing all scraps of tough make-up), then when you add water to it, it becomes a milk that I remove with a flannel to further clean the day off.

Buy Now

Mac 217S Blending Brush, £21 

mac blending brush

I very rarely wear eyeshadow, but when I do I won’t apply with anything by this Mac blending brush. It’s the perfect amount of bushiness to distribute exactly the right amount onto your lids. A couple of swipes and you’re ready to go.

Buy Now

Isle of Paradise Self Tanning Drops in Medium, £19.95 Cult Beauty

isle of paradise drops

This product always gets me compliments. I mix three or four drops in with my daily moisturiser and allow it to develop throughout the day and without fail someone will tell me that I am looking either glowy or super healthy. The bottle lasts ages and comes in again at under twenty quid.

Buy Now

Peter Thomas Roth Water Drench Hyaluronic Cloud Hydra-Gel Eye Patches, £35.50 Cult Beauty

peter thomas roth eye patches

Sometimes, I like to pop these on as soon as I jump out of bed as they de-puff my tired eyes and I actually prefer to massage the excess serum in than use a thick eye cream.

Buy Now

Ameliorate Transforming Body Lotion With A Hint Of Color, £19.50 Cult Beauty

ameliorate tan

I’m not an all-over-the-body tanner (it’s mainly down to laziness), but come spring time I can’t stand it when my pale legs are on show. My answer to this is Ameliorate’s Transforming Body Lotion that gently exfoliates and smoothes my skin, whilst also giving it just a touch of colour. It washes off at the end of the day, so you don’t have to worry about weird tan lines.

Buy Now 

What are you favourite beauty products?

Tweet us @marieclaireuk.

The post It’s my job to test thousands of beauty products, but these are the ones I always go back to appeared first on Marie Claire.

How to recycle beauty products – the handy, print out and keep guide

How to recycle beauty products – the handy, print out and keep guide


As it’s World Oceans Day tomorrow, we want to encourage everyone to do their bit for our seas, not to mention the rest of the planet.

Ever since that final episode of Blue Planet II aired in December 2017, we have known just how horrific the extent of the devastation that plastics has on planet, especially our oceans. According to Global Citizen, by late 2018 88% of those who had seen it had changed their relationship with plastic completely. They went on to call the episode, ‘a key moment sparking the war on plastics.’

recycle beauty products

We have certainly noticed more reusable water bottles on our commute and in the office, some people have gone a week completely plastic-free and huge brands like Waitrose are doing their bit to reduce their plastic waste.

So, does this mean that we are nailing our recycling routines? Apparently not, according to research carried out by Garnier 56% of Brits don’t recycle their bathroom products. It’s thought to be partly down to us being used to having two bins in our kitchen, that it’s almost second nature to separate our recyclable goods. But the other issue is the complexity of bathroom products; a hand soap bottle and an eyeshadow palette are slightly more confusing that the plastic container your mushrooms come in. ‘Beauty product packaging is often composed of a variety of types of material,’ explains Stephen Clarke, Head of Communications at TerraCycle Europe. ‘For example — mirrored glass, cardboard sleeves, paper inserts, expanded plastic foam and more have been known to be used in cosmetics packaging– sometimes all in one item.’ This makes recycling them incredibly difficult.

‘120 billion units of packaging are produced every year by the global cosmetics industry,’ explains Clarke. ‘Of these, very few plastic waste items generated in the bathroom are accepted by most public kerbside recycling programmes. Most common beauty products and packaging contribute to the world’s growing plastic waste problem and, without adequate recovery solutions, are tracked for landfills, burned, buried, or simply littered where waste management is insufficient. Many plastic waste items find their way into oceans and waterways, compounding the problem with environmental hazards.’

recycling beauty products

We need to make sure that where we can, we are recycling our beauty products properly. Below is our guide to what can be recycled and what should just be thrown in the normal bin. When in doubt, throw it out. This is important, says Clarke, because ‘beauty products and packaging that cannot be recycled through the public system will not only be diverted towards landfill or incineration anyway, they slow down the system and have the potential to contaminate bales of secondary material. This is important because we must improve the system to create a circular economy for plastics.’

How to recycle your beauty products

Cellophane

So many beauty products, like fragrances and new make-up products, come wrapped in cellophane. Annoyingly, this cannot be recycled and should be put in your normal bin.

Plastic bottles

Plastic bottles, like shampoos, conditioners and shower gels, are accepted by most recycling programmes. However, make sure that you have emptied and cleaned them out first. You can also leave the lids on as these can be recycled, unless it’s a trigger head or a pump. These will need to go in your normal bin. If you haven’t completely finished your conditioner, do NOT pour it down the sink. Instead, get out as much as possible and put it in your normal bin. (The same goes with any product that you have a little left of.)

Aerosols

Yes, hairsprays and deodorants can be recycled in most household collection schemes. But do make sure they’ve been completely finished before recycling them.

Mascara, lipstick, make-up palettes (eye shadow, bronzer, blusher)

Annoyingly, these are too complicated to recycle. However, TerraCycle has partnered with Garnier to create a free recycling programme for beauty packaging, and these can be taken to one of their allocated drop-off locations. Find your nearest one here. They will also take sheets masks and their wrappers, face wipes and their packets, trigger sprays, pumps, pipettes, roll-on deodorants.

Glass jars

Hooray, as long as these have been emptied and cleaned then these are free to be popped in your recycling bin.

Cotton pads

This is an interesting one, as they have come under quite a bit criticism for being as bad for the environment as face wipes, but in actual fact these can be recycled with your food waste. So after taking your make-up off, take them straight into the kitchen to throw away.

Hair tools

If they still work, check with your local charity shop if they’ll take them. If they’re broken, then they can be recycled at a specific centre. To find your local one, click here.

Nail varnish, fragrance bottles, make-up brushes

These can’t be recycled, so should just be placed in the normal waste bin.

Toothbrushes and toothpaste

Don’t put these in your recycling, there are special drop-off locations (that can be found here) that have been set up by TerraCycle and Colgate.

What else can you do?

  • TerraCycle has also paired with brands like Kiehl’s, L’Occitane and The Body Shop. Theses brands are accepting old beauty containers and will recycle them on your behalf. There are often freebies and discounts if you do it this way.
  • Get your hands on a TerraCycle Zero Waste Box – they send an empty box to your house, you fill it with your beauty empties (shampoo bottles and caps, conditioner bottles and caps, hair gel tubes and caps, non-pressurised hair spray bottles, hair paste plastic jars and caps, lip balm tubes, face soap dispensers and tubes, lotion bottles, lotion tubes, lotion dispensers and jars, non-pressurised shaving foam tubes, lip gloss tubes, mascara tubes, eye liner pencils and cases, eye shadow tubes, concealer tubes and sticks) and then send it back to them to recycle it all.
  • Buy products that are packaged in highly recycled materials, like PET bottles
  • Buy from brands that offer a refillable service or reusable packaging

Brands doing their bit

Ren Skincare

Ren has a company-wide goal of being completely zero waste by 2021. That’s only two years away. It currently has 100% recyclable packaging, refillable solutions and bottles made from reclaimed ocean plastic.

Liberty

In their most recent beauty campaign, Liberty launched Conscious Beauty. Throughout, there has been a drop-off point, where you could take your packaging to be collected and recycled. They also championed all of their brands that are doing what they can to be more sustainable.

Neal’s Yard

From tomorrow until 2nd July, Neal’s Yard will have an in-house recycling scheme. You will be able to take some of the trickiest items to recycle to one of their stores, this will include sample sachets, superfood pouches, facial wipe packages, pumps and atomisers. You will then receive 10% off their next purchase.

The Body Shop

The Body Shop, renowned for its ethical trading initiatives, has teamed up with tech business Plastics For Change and Hasiru Dala, a local Indian NGO and social enterprise, to buy 250 tonnes of plastic collected by waste pickers in Bangalore this year, which will rise to 500 tonnes in 2020. This  recycled plastic will be used to create the bottle of their haircare ranges. There are also recycling points in store.

L’Occitane

L’Occitane have had TerraCycle collection points in their stores and have sponsored beach cleans all over the UK, from Brighton to Edinburgh.

Selfridges

Yesterday saw the launch of Selfridges Project Ocean Beauty Booth, which sees them pledge to ensure that at least 50% of their products are better for humans and the planet by 2022. As part of the initiative, they will have people on hand to help teach customers how to reduce, reuse and recycle plastic waste in their bathrooms.

If that wasn’t enough, here are some products to get your hands on that are ……..

The post How to recycle beauty products – the handy, print out and keep guide appeared first on Marie Claire.

Father’s Day gifts that he’ll actually like (and use)

Father’s Day gifts that he’ll actually like (and use)


Father’s day is just around the corner, so we’ve scouted out the best gift ideas…

Gifts For Him

Struggling to buy a gift this Father’s day? Well have no fear. We’ve rounded up the best Father’s day gifts to get your hands on. You’d think by now we would know what to get and would’ve made some notes from these stylish Christmas gifts for him or the ultimate men’s grooming gift guide – but it gets harder every year.

Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and it gives us a chance every year to show our appreciation for the dads in our lives. And we all want to do our best to show just how much we really love them. Notoriously hard to shop for, dad’s big day is always a bit of struggle. But we’re here with a little help.

We know how important the first man in our life is to us, and sometimes nothing can seem good enough for our lovely dads. But to them it’s the thought that counts and we’ve put all the thought in for you. Whether he’s a sporty dad, more of a clean-cut type, a big ol’bearded guy or maybe he’s just become a father for the first time and could do with being spoiled, there’s something for everyone.

They taught us how to swim and how to ride a bike, and much to our mortification, probably had a good old talking to with our very first boyfriend. But we love them no matter what, and what better way to show it than to buy them a divine tie, a slick pair of shoes or a snazzy travel kit. From old school aviators’ to top of the range aftershaves, we’ve got it covered. Whether you want to splurge or save there’s lots of choices in our epic selection of Father’s day gifts.

Whatever your budget have a look at our edit of the best Father’s day gifts and be sure to take note to ensure he will have a huge grin on his face come Sunday!

The post Father’s Day gifts that he’ll actually like (and use) appeared first on Marie Claire.

The political detail you missed from the Gucci show

The political detail you missed from the Gucci show


Fashion show have become the ultimate platform for a political statement, and yesterday’s Gucci Cruise 2020 was no exception, though you may have missed it at first glance.

Why? Because it being Gucci, the runway was full of spectacularly over-the-top and trendsetting looks, and the front row was full of celebs, from Harry Styles to Stevie Nicks and Elton John.

View this post on Instagram

‘My Body My Choice’ is a feminist slogan from the 70s which appears on the reverse of this jacket seen before the #GucciCruise20 fashion show by @alessandro_michele. This piece echoes the Creative Director’s continuing vision of freedom, equality and self-expression. Since founding @chimeforchange in 2013—the global campaign that represents and advocates for gender equality—@gucci has a longstanding commitment to women and girls by funding projects around the world to support sexual and reproductive rights, maternal health, and the freedom of individual choice. Learn more about the global partners for sexual and family health rights the campaign is donating to in 2019, which can be found in @chimeforchange’s link in bio. @museiincomuneroma #AlessandroMichele #MuseiCapitolini

A post shared by Gucci (@gucci) on May 28, 2019 at 11:47am PDT

The collection itself was flamboyant, full of colours, logos and embellishments, and if you looked beyond the sequins and feathers, you’ll have seen that designer Alessandro Michele’s creations were actually all about choice.

More specifically: the right to choose whether you want an abortion or not, the right of every woman to sexual and reproductive choices.

View this post on Instagram

A uterus is embroidered on a pleated long sleeve gown designed by @alessandro_michele, moments before the #GucciCruise20 fashion show at @museiincomuneroma in Rome. This piece reflects the Creative Director’s continuing vision of freedom, equality and self-expression. Since founding @chimeforchange in 2013—the global campaign that represents and advocates for gender equality—@gucci has a longstanding commitment to women and girls by funding projects around the world to support sexual and reproductive rights, maternal health, and the freedom of individual choice. Learn more about the global partners for sexual and family health rights the campaign is donating to in 2019, which can be found in @chimeforchange’s link in bio. #AlessandroMichele #MuseiCapitolini

A post shared by Gucci (@gucci) on May 29, 2019 at 12:01am PDT

There was a jacket, which at the back featured the slogan, ‘My body, my choice’, a dress embroidered with a uterus and fallopian tubes (albeit in sequins, this is Gucci after all).

On Instagram, Gucci explained, ‘This piece reflects the Creative Director’s continuing vision of freedom, equality and self-expression. Since founding @chimeforchange in 2013—the global campaign that represents and advocates for gender equality—@gucci has a longstanding commitment to women and girls by funding projects around the world to support sexual and reproductive rights, maternal health, and the freedom of individual choice.’

The post The political detail you missed from the Gucci show appeared first on Marie Claire.



SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan: “every set back can be overcome, you just have to change your lens on it”

SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan: “every set back can be overcome, you just have to change your lens on it”


SoulCycle is launching in London next month, so we headed to NYC to find out what all the hype is about

Melanie Whelan, CEO of SoulCycle
Melanie Whelan, CEO of SoulCycle

Even if you haven’t managed to take an indoor cycling class at SoulCycle stateside, chances are you’ve still heard about it. It’s one of the most talked about brands in the fitness industry and for thirteen years it has been redefining health and happiness through unique mind-body-soul experiences. More than 20,000 people take classes every day and its VIP fans include Beyoncé and Jay-Z, Victoria and David Beckham, Lady Gaga, Michelle Obama and Madonna. It’s a bit of a cult, but at the same time it’s for everyone.

It’s so much more than just an indoor cycling studio. The brand focuses on hospitality and community – you instantly feel part of the family the moment you walk through the door. It has an apparel arm; has collaborated with Nike, Lululemon and Le Labo; partnered with Apple Music and hosted live experiences with The Chainsmokers and Ciara. SoulCycle is a powerhouse that hasn’t just thought about the what, they’ve thought about the why. Its success story is well deserved – I first took a class five years ago in LA and still remember the out-of-body feeling. I can’t quite explain what prompted that moment, but I felt amazing – I didn’t cry but some people do (there’s actually a ‘crying at SoulCycle’ GIF on Instagram Stories). You’ll have to try it out for yourself, and now you can. The wait is finally over for Londoners – SoulCycle is coming to Soho next month.

We headed to New York City to immerse ourselves in this unique experience. We met the riders and the team, including Chief Executive Officer Melanie Whelan. Melanie has been part of team SoulCycle for seven years and has spent four of those at the helm as CEO. Since her appointment, she has driven huge growth and the brand now has over 90 studios in 18 markets. Before joining the company, Melanie held leadership positions with Equinox, Virgin Management and Starwood Hotels & Resorts and she’s been named one of Fortune’s 40 Under 40. We chatted about success, failure and the importance of feedback…

Why is London your first studio location outside of the US and Canada?
We’re huge fans of London and it’s a market we’ve had our eye on for a long time because we know we have a big ridership community there already. It’s such a natural extension of what we do here in New York, so hopefully it will translate relatively straightforwardly with the cultural nuances on top. We’re really excited.

It has been a labour of love for the past few years. We wanted to make sure we had the right strategy in place – we’re moving a team over [to London]. This is a very community-focused brand and we’ve always wanted every SoulCycle studio to feel like the only SoulCycle studio. Everything takes longer than I would like it to, but I think it’ll be worth the wait.

Why is SoulCycle so successful?
It’s the people, all of them. The riders, our instructors, our operators at the front desk. They’re the ones that will say “Kim, I haven’t seen you in a week, let me get you in for a class; how are your kids? What’s happening in your life?” Those personal connections are a big part of our experience. We truly scout globally for the best instructor talent in the world and have a rigorous training programme, so that they know the fundamentals of what it is that we deliver in the room – physically, emotionally and musically. Then we have ongoing training and development, to ensure they are developing their craft and experiences as they go.

Our riders are the ones that make it all happen. They’re the ones that come into the room and bring the energy, they’re the ones that tell their friends and bring more people in. I get asked all the time, why didn’t you launch here sooner? Why didn’t you scale faster? And I always say, this is a curated human experience and and we’re bringing people along the journey with us. We’re not scaling hamburgers, t-shirts or salads. Right? We could just buy more lettuce and make more salads. To keep a brand really special you have to be careful about how you expand and make sure you do it right, not fast.

The SoulCycle studio in action

The SoulCycle studio in action

What is your perception of the London market and how do you think SoulCycle will fit in?
First of all, we don’t really view ourselves in the boutique fitness space, we believe that we are an experiential brand that is community based and hospitality driven. It’s all about you and your experience. Our riders say they come to us at first for the workout, but they stay for these connections – friendships, community and everything that happens in the lobby. I don’t think there’s anything really like it in London and in many of the markets here in the US. There’s no question that there are a lot of boutique fitness operators in this space, but what we do is differentiated and I think we will be a new experience for the [London] market.

Is there anything you’re afraid about?
I wouldn’t say afraid. We are conscious that the market is different, especially from what we see in New York. Our riders in New York will come to the studio in the morning to workout and then they’ll go home to shower before going to work. I think London seems like a more transient consumer – fitness is on their way to work, and so we’re mindful to make sure that we have the right comfortable accommodation for people, as they move through their traffic and daily life.

In every one of the markets that we’ve opened in, we’ve taken a really thoughtful approach to making sure that the nuance of how we operate – from the music that we play to the schedule that we create – is really relevant for that local community and we’ve done the same thing with London. We’ve asked a lot of questions. What music do you guys like? What time of day do you like to workout? How late? And we listen not just before, but then once we open [we ask], is this working? Then we tweak as we go. We’ve been actively listening for a couple of years now and we really understand what the consumer wants. The consumer is changing every day and we will just continue that conversation when we open.

Why is constant feedback so important?
I think it speaks to what we do. We are in the business of human potential, we want you to be the best version of your and we are going to coach you on that ride. We are all works in progress, Marvin (Marvin Foster Jr, head of talent) actually says this a lot – it’s not about perfection, it’s about progress. Is it another turn on the resistance knob, is it a heavier hand weight that you’re picking up, are you running out of the saddle for the whole song? The little accomplishments are just progress up that ladder to who you are.

When I started with Soul we only had 1lb or 2lb weights in the room and most people were using 1lb weights. We now have 5lb, 8lb and 10lb weights, because the riders are stronger so they are looking for new challenges. We’re always adapting and changing, because we believe in progress.

Inside a SoulCycle class

Inside a SoulCycle class

Have there been any failures and how have you learned from them?
How long do we have? You learn as you go and you make mistakes. One of the things that comes to mind from the early days is when we built a new propriety booking system. All our reservations go live Monday at noon for the week. 25% of classes are gone in the first five minutes so this time is a big part of our experience and a couple of years ago we launched a new system but it didn’t work.

We just weren’t ready, we hadn’t done enough testing on the back end. The amount of times I’ve thought, if I could just go back and un–press that button. But you just learn and now every update or change that we have makes us learn and it wasn’t the end the world but it was a rough couple of days. We’ve got lots of stories like that.

Melanie Whelan, SoulCycle CEO

Melanie Whelan, SoulCycle’s CEO, in the London studio

What’s your daily routine like? When do you ride?
I travel a lot for work, so when I’m home I’ll get up very early. I have a nine-year-old and a seven-year-old, so when I’m home I try to be in their traffic pattern in the morning. We do breakfast, I drop them for school and then I ride. I typically ride most mornings. I love, not just the class (obviously the class is an incredible experience), but just being in the studios and being able to talk to the teams and the riders, I just learn so much. We always say you learn more in 30 minutes at the front desk in one of the studios than you are going to sitting at your desk all day. Then my days are pretty much in my office and doing fun stuff. This is a great day. I get to talk about opening SoulCycle in London!

When I’m travelling, for the most part I’m in cities where we have SoulCycle now. That was the hardest part about growing the business was spending a lot of time travelling to new markets where there was no SoulCycle, so I didn’t get to experience it as much. Now we’re everywhere it’s a lot easier, exercise is really important to me.

Do all your employees ride?
We don’t require people to ride but we very much encourage it as part of the employee experience. Coincidentally, right now I can see our finance director and he’s got a bazillion numbers on his screen. Whatever he’s doing is going to be much more contextualised if he’s experienced it in the room. If we’re looking at instructor performance, if he can actually be in the room and relate to Marvin and what he’s doing, then he’s going to think about his work differently. I get asked a lot, do you force people? Absolutely not, but it’s such a benefit of working here, and because it’s what we do, I always encourage people. If you’re having a rough day, go take a class.

Why is the experience element so significant?
This is a place where you come for a physical, mental and musical experience. We really believe that as human beings we are so over-stretched right now – anxiety is at an all-time high and you are on it 24 hours a day. If you’re not reading an email then you’re posting something on Instagram and we enable you to park that noise for 45 minutes, to go inside your head, listen to great music or push yourself physically.

Yes, our instructors coach you to turn up the resistance, but you are stronger than you think you are and that’s actually not about the bike at all, that’s about you and your life. That is what SoulCycle really means – it’s not about cycling really at all, yes you do that here and really, it’s a great workout, but what really keeps people connected to this is the sense of community, inspiration, personal development and self-accountability to be a better version [of yourself] tomorrow.

What’s your superpower?
Relentless positivity. I fundamentally believe that the glass is always half full and my personal mantra is ‘we figure it out’. It’s not about finding the direct yes, there are some things that can’t be fixed but there is another solution that we can find, in a different way. Every set back can be overcome and you just have to change your lens on it. It’s hard to do, but you can train your brain that way.

You’ve mentioned having a millennial mentor before, how does that work?
I view it very much as a two-way street. I had a long conversation with my friend last night about her career and a decision she is trying to make. She thanked me for mentoring her and I found myself coaching her in the conversation, in a way that I was actually hearing in my own head for my own self. I think mentoring goes in all directions and is something I feel very passionate about, especially as a female leader. I think we need more strong female leaders in the world so bringing women up behind me is really important.

My millennial mentor is a young woman who is also my go-to for trend spotting, because I’m a mum of two kids who travels for work and works a lot, so I like to go out in the world to see what’s cool, what’s happening and what a different generation is spending time on. It’s as much about career mentoring as it is about trend mentoring, cool hunting, understanding consumption patterns of a different generation, many of whom are our consumer, so that kind of activity is really important.

What would your advice to your younger self be?
Don’t take it all so seriously. I think we all think when we’re young we need a plan, and we have to executive the plan by a certain point. The truth is that life is a jungle gym – it is not a ladder and you are going to go up to go sideways, to go back to go three steps further. Just relax, because the journey is a lot of fun if you let it be and often sometimes things are going to take care of themselves. Not every day is going to be great and that’s okay too.

For more information visit soul-cycle.com/london.

SoulCycle’s first London studio will open on 14 June at 3-4 Great Marlborough Street.

The post SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan: “every set back can be overcome, you just have to change your lens on it” appeared first on Marie Claire.

SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan: “every set back can be overcome, you just have to change your lens on it”

SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan: “every set back can be overcome, you just have to change your lens on it”


SoulCycle is launching in London next month, so we headed to NYC to find out what all the hype is about

Melanie Whelan, CEO of SoulCycle
Melanie Whelan, CEO of SoulCycle

If you haven’t managed to take an indoor cycling class at SoulCycle stateside, then the chances are you’ve heard about it. It’s one of the most talked about brands in the fitness industry and for thirteen years it has been redefining health and happiness through unique mind-body-soul experiences. More than 20,000 people take classes every day and its VIP fans include Beyoncé and Jay-Z, Victoria and David Beckham, Lady Gaga, Michelle Obama and Madonna. It’s a bit of a cult, but at the same time it’s for everyone.

It’s not just an indoor cycling studio, it’s so much more than that. The brand focuses on hospitality and community – you instantly feel a part of the family the moment you walk through the door. It has an apparel arm, has collaborated with Nike, Lululemon and Le Labo, they’ve partnered with Apple Music and hosted live experiences with The Chainsmokers and Ciara. SoulCycle is a powerhouse that hasn’t just thought about the what, they’ve thought about the why. It’s so successful but it deserves to be – I first took a class five years ago in LA and I still remember the out-of-body feeling, I can’t tell you what it was exactly that gave me that moment, but I felt amazing – I didn’t cry but some people do (there’s actually a ‘crying at SoulCycle’ GIF on Instagram Stories). You’ll have to try it out for yourself, and now you can. The wait is finally over for Londoners and SoulCycle is coming to Soho next month.

We headed to New York City to see what makes this experience so unique, meet the riders and the team, including Chief Executive Officer Melanie Whelan. Melanie has been part of team SoulCycle for seven years and has spent four of those at the helm as CEO. Since her appointment, she has driven huge growth and the brand now has over 90 studios in 18 markets. Before joining the company, Melanie held leadership positions with Equinox, Virgin Management and Starwood Hotels & Resorts and she’s been named one of Fortune’s 40 Under 40. We chatted about success, failure and the importance of feedback…

Why is London your first studio location outside of the US and Canada?
We’re huge fans of London and it’s a market we’ve had our eye on for a long time because we know we have a big ridership community there already. It’s such a natural extension of what we do here in New York, so hopefully it will translate relatively straightforwardly with the cultural nuances on top. We’re really excited.

It has been a labour of love for the past few years. We wanted to make sure we had the right strategy in place – we’re moving a team over [to London]. This is a very community focused brand and we’ve always wanted every SoulCycle studio to feel like the only SoulCycle studio. Everything takes longer than I would like it to, but I think it’ll be worth the wait.

Why is SoulCycle so successful?
It’s the people, all of them. The riders, our instructors, our operators at the front desk. They’re the ones that will say “Kim, I haven’t seen you in a week, let me get you in for a class, how are your kids, what’s happening in your life?” Those personal connections are a big part of our experience. We truly scout globally for the best instructor talent in the world and have a rigorous training programme, so that they know the fundamentals of what it is that we deliver in the room – physically, emotionally and musically. Then we have ongoing training and development, to ensure they are developing their craft and experiences as they go.

Our riders are the ones that make it all happen. They’re the ones that come into the room and bring the energy, they’re the ones that tell their friends and bring more people in. I get asked all the time, why didn’t you launch here sooner? Why didn’t you scale faster? And I always say, this is a curated human experience and and we’re bringing people along the journey with us. We’re not scaling hamburgers, t-shirts or salads. Right? We could just buy more lettuce and make more salads. To keep a brand really special you have to be careful about how you expand and make sure you do it right, not fast.

The SoulCycle studio in action

The SoulCycle studio in action

What is your perception of the London market and how do you think SoulCycle will fit in?
First of all, we don’t really view ourselves in the boutique fitness space, we believe that we are an experiential brand that is community based and hospitality driven. It’s all about you and your experience. Our riders say they come to us at first for the workout but they stay for these connections – friendships, community and everything that happens in the lobby. I don’t think there’s anything really like it in London and in many of the markets here in the US. There’s no question that there are a lot of boutique fitness operators in this space, but what we do is differentiated and I think we will be a new experience for the [London] market.

Is there anything you’re afraid about?
I wouldn’t say afraid. We are conscious that the market is different, especially from what we see in New York. Our riders in New York will come to the studio in the morning to workout and then they’ll go home to shower before going to work. I think London seems like a more transient consumer – fitness is on their way to work, and so we’re mindful to make sure that we have the right comfortable accommodation for people, as they move through their traffic and daily life.

In every one of the markets that we’ve opened in, we’ve taken a really thoughtful approach to making sure that the nuance of how we operate – from the music that we play to the schedule that we create – is really relevant for that local community and we’ve done the same thing with London. We’ve asked a lot of questions. What music do you guys like? What time of day do you like to workout? How late? And we listen not just before, but then once we open – is this working? Then we tweak as we go. We’ve been actively listening for a couple of years now and we really understand what the consumer wants. The consumer is changing every day and we will just continue that conversation when we open.

Why is constant feedback so important?
I think it speaks to what we do. We are in the business of human potential, we want you to be the best version of your and we are going to coach you on that ride. We are all works in progress, Marvin (Marvin Foster Jr, head of talent) actually says this a lot – it’s not about perfection, it’s about progress. Is it another turn on the resistance knob, is it a heavier hand weight that you’re picking up, are you running out of the saddle for the whole song? The little accomplishments are just progress up that ladder to who you are.

When I started with Soul we only had 1lb or 2lb weights in the room and most people were using 1lb weights. We now have 5lb, 8lb and 10lb weights, because the riders are stronger so they are looking for new challenges. We’re always adapting and changing, because we believe in progress.

Inside a SoulCycle class

Inside a SoulCycle class

Have there been any failure moments and how have you learned from them?
How long do we have? You learn as you go and you make mistakes. One of the things that comes to mind from the early days is when we built a new propriety booking system. All our reservations go live Monday at noon for the week. 25% of classes are gone in the first five minutes so this time is a big part of our experience and a couple of years ago we launched a new system but it didn’t work.

We just weren’t ready, we hadn’t done enough testing on the back end. The amount of times I’ve thought, if I could just go back and un–press that button. But you just learn and now every update or change that we have makes us learn and it wasn’t the end the world but it was a rough couple of days. We’ve got lots of stories like that.

Melanie Whelan, SoulCycle CEO

Melanie Whelan, SoulCycle’s CEO, in the London studio

What’s your daily routine like? When do you ride?
I travel a lot for work, so when I’m home I’ll get up very early. I have a nine-year-old and a seven-year-old, so when I’m home I try to be in their traffic pattern in the morning. We do breakfast, I drop them for school and then I ride. I typically ride most mornings. I love, not just the class (obviously the class is an incredible experience), but just being in the studios and being able to talk to the teams and the riders, I just learn so much. We always say you learn more in 30 minutes at the front desk in one of the studios than you are going to sitting at your desk all day. Then my days are pretty much in my office and doing fun stuff. This is a great day. I get to talk about opening SoulCycle in London!

When I’m travelling, for the most part I’m in cities where we have SoulCycle now. That was the hardest part about growing the business was spending a lot of time travelling to new markets where there was no SoulCycle, so I didn’t get to experience it as much. Now we’re everywhere it’s a lot easier, exercise is really important to me.

Do all your employees ride?
We don’t require people to ride but we very much encourage it as part of the employee experience. Coincidentally, right now I can see our finance director and he’s got a bazillion numbers on his screen. Whatever he’s doing is going to be much more contextualised if he’s experienced it in the room. If we’re looking at instructor performance, if he can actually be in the room and relate to Marvin and what he’s doing, then he’s going to think about his work differently. I get asked a lot, do you force people? Absolutely not, but it’s such a benefit of working here, and because it’s what we do, I always encourage people. If you’re having a rough day, go take a class.

Why is the experience element so significant?
This is a place where you come for a physical, mental and musical experience. We really believe that as human beings we are so over-stretched right now – anxiety is at an all-time high and you are on it 24 hours a day. If you’re not reading an email then you’re posting something on Instagram and we enable you to park that noise for 45 minutes, to go inside your head, listen to great music or push yourself physically.

Yes, our instructors coach you to turn up the resistance, but you are stronger than you think you are and that’s actually not about the bike at all, that’s about you and your life. That is what SoulCycle really means – it’s not about cycling really at all, yes you do that here and really, it’s a great workout, but what really keeps people connected to this is the sense of community, inspiration, personal development and self-accountability to be a better version [of yourself] tomorrow.

What’s your superpower?
Relentless positivity. I fundamentally believe that the glass is always half full and my personal mantra is ‘we figure it out’. It’s not about finding the direct yes, there are some things that can’t be fixed but there is another solution that we can find, in a different way. Every set back can be overcome and you just have to change your lens on it. It’s hard to do, but you can train your brain that way.

You’ve mentioned having a millennial mentor before, how does that work?
I view it very much as a two-way street. I had a long conversation with my friend last night about her career and a decision she is trying to make. She thanked me for mentoring her and I found myself coaching her in the conversation, in a way that I was actually hearing in my own head for my own self. I think mentoring goes in all directions and is something I feel very passionate about, especially as a female leader. I think we need more strong female leaders in the world so bringing women up behind me is really important.

My millennial mentor is a young woman who is also my go-to for trend spotting, because I’m a mum of two kids who travels for work and works a lot, so I like to go out in the world to see what’s cool, what’s happening and what a different generation is spending time on. It’s as much about career mentoring as it is about trend mentoring, cool hunting, understanding consumption patterns of a different generation, many of whom are our consumer, so that kind of activity is really important.

What would your advice to your younger self be?
Don’t take it all so seriously. I think we all think when we’re young we need a plan, and we have to executive the plan by a certain point. The truth is that life is a jungle gym – it is not a ladder and you are going to go up to go sideways, to go back to go three steps further. Just relax, because the journey is a lot of fun if you let it be and often sometimes things are going to take care of themselves. Not every day is going to be great and that’s okay too.

For more information visit soul-cycle.com/london.

SoulCycle’s first London studio will open on 14 June at 3-4 Great Marlborough Street.

The post SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan: “every set back can be overcome, you just have to change your lens on it” appeared first on Marie Claire.