High spec hair: The new-gen styles for 2019

High spec hair: The new-gen styles for 2019


From Glossy Afro Curls to the latest ‘glass’ hair trend, here’s our pick of the best hair ideas and innovations
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Cutting edge

‘Glass hair’, like K-beauty’s glass skin, is a term coined to describe a razor sharp cut – usually a bob – coupled with a mega-watt, reflective gleam. A clarifying wash is key to remove grease, dirt and any last remnants of product residue that can create a dull veil over strands. Then ramp up hydration with OGX Hydrate + Marula Oil Conditioner, £6.99. You can only really achieve a look like this with heat, so mist on SHOW Beauty’s Sheer Thermal Protect spray, £35, before blasting straight with the Babyliss Rose Blush 2200 hairdryer, £45.

Take your shine to the next level by smoothing down cuticles with the cool air setting- simultaneously, pull hair from the roots if pouffy ends are a problem. Then, smooth flyaways with the new ghd Platinum+ Styler, £175, sweeping it through your locks twice. Finish with a light-weight lotion like Colour Wow Dream Coat, £24, to keep your ‘do’ slick for the duration.

Photography by Jason Hetherington

Big bounce

It’s hard enough for any of us to achieve the hair we really want, but battling straggly strands and naturally limp roots too? It can feel like an impossible task. That is, until this year’s raft of styling products promising sky-high volume and one much-hyped power tool came along. Green People Clarifying Vitamin Shampoo, £13, nixes oily roots and build-up that weighs skinny strands down – but by using gentle botanicals, not harsh foaming agents. Then, apply L’Oreal Professional Source Essentielle Nourishing Cleansing Infusion Nourishing Balm, £22, through the ends.

Sprayed on to wet strands, Bumble and Bumble Full Potential Booster Spray, £40, reboots hair that is not as abundant as it used to be with protective ingredients that make it feel fuller. For limp roots, try Living Proof’s Full Dry Volume Blast, £25, to hoik everything up. Cost aside, Dyson’s Airwrap Styler, £399.99, attracts and wraps hair around the barrel, curling it for you and adding body. Seriously: tool of the year.

Photography by Jason Hetherington

The new blow dry

Full-bodied, swishy hair (NOT an 80s ‘power’ blowdry) is considered de rigueur these days. Better still, you can master it at home. Thickening sprays and mousses give the illusion of bulk. Both contain polymers that coat the hair and make it seem bigger, but also protect it and ensure the style lasts. For straight hair, go for a spray formula- distribute the Aveda Thickening Tonic, £22, evenly through damp hair from roots to ends. Or, rake an egg-sized dollop of mousse through it if you’re adding waves or curls – we rate Evo’s Macgyver Multi-Use Mousse, £17.50.

Need height? Wrap each section around a large round brush and aim your hairdryer at the roots. Finally, apply a light mist of hairspray. Oribe Thick Dry Finishing Spray, £38, does more than simply lock your style in place; it contains panthenol to swell the hair shaft. Plus, you can brush it out as you go so you’ll get lift but without any stickiness.

Photography by Jason Hetherington

Skincare for hair

More often than not when we talk about shiny hair, we’re really talking about straight hair – light-reflecting strands that hang in sleek curtains around the face. So it follows that the same moisturising steps we take to make our skin look dewy can also ramp up the sheen on poker-straight locks. Start with a hair serum. In the same way that a face serum targets specific concerns and absorbs beyond just the top layer, Pureology Style + Protect Shine Bright Taming Serum, £23.50, locks in frizz-fighting coriander seed oil while Virtue’s Perfect Ending Split End Serum, £19, seals down frayed cuticles.

Then layer hair oil on top, as it’s powered by some of the same nourishing ingredients normally found in face oils. New natural Japanese import Uka Hair Oil Windy Lady, £29.50, is non-greasy so ideal for fine hair while Kerastase Elixir Ultime L’Huile Rose, £41.40, contains a hydrating trio of marula, camellia and argan oils.

Photography by Jason Hetherington

Get kinky

Afro hair is making waves in fashion and beauty spaces – and frankly it’s about time. But more importantly, this once-marginalised hair type is set to become one of the most influential – so much so that the US market for black hair is estimated to reach approximately $2.5 billion (around £1.9 billion) in 2019. Cue haircare that specifically targets the needs of tight coils, which are the most porous and more damage-prone.

Knowing that Afro hair is more likely to drink up potentially drying chemicals, Boucleme only uses plant derived ingredients. The Curl Conditioner, £17, for example, is packed with omegas 3, 6 and 9 plus virgin coconut and argan oils to prevent breakage. Additionally, haircare founder Vernon Francois, whose clients include actress Lupita Nyong’o, has this tip for using his Pure-Fro Shampoo, £19.50: ‘Part hair into four sections and apply the shampoo on to dry hair as this ensures your scalp is cleansed but not dehydrated.’

Photography by Jason Hetherington

Blonde ambition

It’s official: Brits prefer blonde. Last year 42% of women who coloured their hair transformed their tresses to blonde, with 18% opting to go platinum. But as anyone who has gone to the light side will tell you, the biggest bugbear is unwanted brassy and yellow streaks.

The minerals and metals in hard water are the main culprits. Dyed blonde hair is more porous so high levels of copper, in particular, can kill your shade – one reason Clairol has included technology in its hair colours that encapsulates copper and prevents it from reacting with water and other free radicals. Think long-lasting colour and mirrorball shiny highlights.

Photography by Jason Hetherington

Play it safe

Sometimes you want to switch things up by changing your colour. Unless, of course, you fall into the rare one per cent of the world’s population who suffers from an allergy called paraphenylenediamine, or PPD, a chemical used in most commercial hair dyes. Clairol have come to the rescue with an innovative molecule called ME+ that reduces the risk of a reaction for those without an existing allergy.

Photography by Jason Hetherington

How? The ME+ molecule in the Clairol Nice’N Easy Permanent Colour range, £6.49, has a new shape that is harder for your immune system to recognise. ‘This molecule doesn’t fit so easily into the protective cells that can trigger an immune response,’ explains Dr. Casten Goebel, COTY’s toxicology expert. Expect the same glossy finish as your regular dye – minus the risk.

Pick up a copy of the January issue of Marie Claire on newstands now.

The post High spec hair: The new-gen styles for 2019 appeared first on Marie Claire.

What exactly is balayage and why is it so popular?

What exactly is balayage and why is it so popular?


Make an appointment with your stylist now

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Stewart Cook/REX/Shutterstock (9781595ay)

Balayage has been around for a while, but this timeless technique is creeping its way back into being one of the most popular hair colour requests in salons today. We’ve spoken to the some of the leading experts to get some professional insight into the booming hair trend, balayage.

What is balayage?

Balayage is a French word meaning to sweep or to paint. ‘It’s a freehand hair colouring technique that gives a really blended natural look with no harsh or obvious regrowth lines,’ advises royal and celebrity hairdresser, Richard Ward.

Balayage allows for a sun-kissed natural looking hair colour, with softer, less noticeable re-growth. The principal idea being less is more when creating a natural, multi-tonal finish. The technique uses patches of light and shade to create multiple dimensions to the colour.

It’s a great method if you want to refresh your colour but don’t want to go for a bold colour overhaul.

Chrissy Teigan balayage

How is balayage applied?

Balayage is painted on the surface of the hair strand and not saturated through the section until the very tips. This ensures a smooth, blended stroke of colour. It can also be called a freehand technique because no foil or meche are used to create the highlights.

How long does it take to do balayage?

The depth of balayage can vary so much from a ‘few small highlights that will only take a matter of minutes to a full on, triple process look that can take up to 3 hours,’ says Josh Wood, founder of Josh Wood Atelier and Redken Global Colour Creative Director. Though it can take quite a long time to do a multi-tonal, layered balayage compared to regular colour the benefit of the application means you will be able to leave longer between your next colour appointment. If you want a few balayage babylights this may take as little as 45 minutes.

What sets it apart from traditional hair colouring?

Balayage is quite different to traditional highlights because no foil is used and the colour is painted on freehand. The finished result is ‘less uniform than typical highlights’ says Richard Ward. If you’ve ever been worried about having stripey colour after a visit to the hairdressers, balayage is a sure way to avoid that harsh contrast between colours – especially if you’re going blonder.

The colour created is totally bespoke to you and can even be placed in a way to compliment or distract attention away from certain features on the face.

What’s making it so popular recently?

Ten years ago balayage wasn’t the colouring phenomenon it is today, it’s quite a specific method of colouring that hasn’t been widely taught in the UK until recently. Balayage ‘is especially popular with celebrities and is a classic look for the red carpet’ says Richard Ward. After spotting it on celebrities like Gisele, Chrissy Teigen and Jessica Alba, there has been a surge in interest for the technique as people are requesting the look.

Some celebrities who love balayage include Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Olivia Palermo, Jessica Biel, Jennifer Lopez, Kim Kardashian and Amber Heard.

And don’t think just because you don’t have long hair you can’t achieve the look. No matter how short your locks are, you can rock balayage. Case in point? Ruby Rose’s balayage pixie crop.

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Startraks Photo/REX/Shutterstock (9781830ac)

Does it require a lot of maintenance? 

‘Typically balayage requires far less maintenance than traditional colour because it grows out beautifully and there are no strong regrowth lines,’ says Richard Ward. It also means you can wait for longer between appointments so it’s ‘the perfect technique for a modern, busy woman.’

‘If you want to make your balayage last as long as possible, opt for a babylight – it’s the most subtle type of colour you can go for’ advises Josh Wood. Investing in some good quality colour care styling products is also advisable to keep your colour looking fresh for longer.

If your colour turns brassy after a while you can ‘refresh it without going for a full top up with a toner or gloss to give your shine back.’ says Wood.

Jennifer Lopez balayage

Is it suitable for all hair types/lengths?

It works on both light and dark hair depending on how much lighter you want to go and all hair textures. Whether it’s straight, wavy or curly the colour will still work well and look great.

‘Balayage works on all hair lengths apart from on very short or cropped hair (think Pixie crops),’ advises international hair colourist, L’Oreal Professional Ambassador and Marie Claire’s 2018 Colourist of the Year Jack Howard.

The technique is particularly popular amongst celebrities with long, textured hair as it creates a beautiful, beachy style.

If however, you have balayage on you short hair – let’s say a bob – and then want to try the long beach style, Hershesons recently launched a range of balayage tape hair extensions, that will seamlessly blend in. The 60-minute service includes a colour-matching consultation, fitting, cut, wash & blow-dry and the tapes should last you up-to eight weeks, and the hair can be re-used up to three times.

Gisele Bundchen balayage

 

How long does balayage last?

One of the biggest perks of balayage is that “it doesn’t require as much upkeep as traditional colour” advises Josh Wood. The blended finish means you can leave longer between your salon appointments, depending on the style of balayage you go for you can leave up to 4 months between top-ups.

What’s the difference between ombre and balayage?

Balayage is a totally blended hair look, there are no lines or blocks of colour and the graduation between shades is much more subtle. Some lengths of the hair are kept darker for a seamless colour finish.

Ombre hair has a more defined contrast between the roots and tips of the hair with colour starting mid-way down the strands. Ombre colour ‘is a more noticeable, statement look compared to Balayage,’ says Richard Ward. Want to know more? Check out our round-up if want to find out more about ombre.

Does balayage work on grey hair?

Balayage works for all colours but ‘the only thing is it won’t cover grey hair,’ advises Josh Wood, ‘it will only help blend in the grey to disguise it so if you want full coverage for greys it might not be the right choice for you.’

What makes it timeless?

Balayage creates a totally bespoke, personalised colour finish. Healthy, natural looking hair will always be ‘in’ which is why the technique has remained popular for so many years. Depending on what you’re looking for the finish can be subtle or quite bold. It’s the ability to completely tailor the colour effect that makes this such a popular colour choice.

The post What exactly is balayage and why is it so popular? appeared first on Marie Claire.



So, what exactly is balayage and why do we love it so much?

So, what exactly is balayage and why do we love it so much?


Make an appointment with your stylist now

Balayage has been around for a while, but this timeless technique is creeping its way back into being one of the most popular hair colour requests in salons today. We’ve spoken to the experts to get some professional insight into the booming hair trend, balayage.

What is balayage?

Balayage is a French word meaning to sweep or to paint. ‘It’s a freehand hair colouring technique that gives a really blended natural look with no harsh or obvious regrowth lines,’ advises royal and celebrity hairdresser, Richard Ward.

Balayage allows for a sun-kissed natural looking hair colour, similar to what nature gives us as children, with softer, less noticeable re-growth. The principal idea being less is more when creating a natural, multi-tonal finish. The technique uses patches of light and shade to create multiple dimensions to the colour.

It’s a great method if you want to refresh your colour but don’t want to go for a bold colour overhaul.

Chrissy Teigan balayage

How is balayage applied?

Balayage is painted on the surface of the hair strand and not saturated through the section until the very tips. This ensures a smooth, blended stroke of colour. It can also be called a freehand technique because no foil or meche are used to create the highlights.

How long does it take to do balayage?

The depth of balayage can vary so much from a ‘few small highlights that will only take a matter of minutes to a full on, triple process look that can take up to 3 hours,’ says Josh Wood, founder of Josh Wood Atelier and Redken Global Colour Creative Director. Though it can take quite a long time to do a multi-tonal, layered balayage compared to regular colour the benefit of the application means you will be able to leave longer between your next colour appointment. If you want a few balayage babylights this may take as little as 45 minutes.

What sets it apart from traditional hair colouring?

Balayage is quite different to traditional highlights because no foil is used and the colour is painted on freehand. The finished result is ‘less uniform than typical highlights’ says Richard Ward. If you’ve ever been worried about having stripey colour after a visit to the hairdressers, balayage is a sure way to avoid that harsh contrast between colours – especially if you’re going blonder.

The colour created is totally bespoke to you and can even be placed in a way to compliment or distract attention away from certain features on the face.

Are you using the right shampoo for your hair? This quick quiz will tell you…

What’s making it so popular recently?

Ten years ago balayage wasn’t the colouring phenomenon it is today, it’s quite a specific method of colouring that hasn’t been widely taught in the UK until recently. Balayage ‘is especially popular with celebrities and is a classic look for the red carpet’ says Richard Ward. After spotting it on celebrities like Gisele, Chrissy Teigen and Jessica Alba, there has been a surge in interest for the technique as people are requesting the look.

Some celebrities who love balayage include Olivia Palermo, Jessica Biel, Jennifer Lopez, Kim Kardashian and Amber Heard.

Jessica Alba balayage

Does it require a lot of maintenance?

‘Typically balayage requires far less maintenance than traditional colour because it grows out beautifully and there are no strong regrowth lines,’ says Richard Ward. It also means you can wait for longer between appointments so it’s ‘the perfect technique for a modern, busy woman.’

‘If you want to make your balayage last as long as possible, opt for a babylight – it’s the most subtle type of colour you can go for’ advises Josh Wood. Investing in some good quality colour care styling products is also advisable to keep your colour looking fresh for longer.

If your colour turns brassy after a while you can ‘refresh it without going for a full top up with a toner or gloss to give your shine back.’ says Wood.

Jennifer Lopez balayage

Is it suitable for all hair types/lengths?

It works on both light and dark hair depending on how much lighter you want to go and all hair textures. Whether it’s straight, wavy or curly the colour will still work well and look great.

‘Balayage works on all hair lengths apart from on very short or cropped hair,’ advises international hair colourist Jack Howard.

The technique is particularly popular amongst celebrities with long, textured hair as it creates a beautiful, beachy style.

Gisele Bundchen balayage

 

How long does balayage last?

One of the biggest perks of balayage is that “it doesn’t require as much upkeep as traditional colour” advises Josh Wood. The blended finish means you can leave longer between your salon appointments, depending on the style of balayage you go for you can leave up to 4 months between top-ups.

What’s the difference between ombre and balayage?

Balayage is a totally blended hair look, there are no lines or blocks of colour and the graduation between shades is much more subtle. Some lengths of the hair are kept darker for a seamless colour finish.

Ombre hair has a more defined contrast between the roots and tips of the hair with colour starting mid-way down the strands. Ombre colour ‘is a more noticeable, statement look compared to Balayage,’ says Richard Ward. Want to know more? Check out our round-up if want to find out more about ombre.

Does balayage work on grey hair?

Balayage works for all colours but ‘the only thing is it won’t cover grey hair,’ advises Josh Wood, ‘it will only help blend in the grey to disguise it so if you want full coverage for greys it might not be the right choice for you.’

What makes it timeless?

Balayage creates a totally bespoke, personalised colour finish. Healthy, natural looking hair will always be ‘in’ which is why the technique has remained popular for so many years. Depending on what you’re looking for the finish can be subtle or quite bold. It’s the ability to completely tailor the colour effect that makes this such a popular colour choice.

Contact Jack Howard via twitter @jackhoward_srh

Contact Richard Ward via twitter @richardwardhair

Contact Josh Wood via twitter @joshwoodcolour

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The post So, what exactly is balayage and why do we love it so much? appeared first on Marie Claire.