Clueless is getting a modern-day TV reboot, but there's a big twist in store

Clueless is getting a modern-day TV reboot, but there's a big twist in store


Thoughts?

Cher Horowitz is one of the biggest 90s muses of days gone by, with our love for Clueless never wavering (side note: have you ever noticed this major mistake in the movie before?).

Well, get your favourite Clueless quotes ready, because the iconic movie is apparently getting a TV reboot very soon. Yes, really!

It’s not the first time that the film has been adapted for the small screen – a three-series show ran from 1996 to 1999 – but it’s now getting a millennial make-over.

According to Deadline, the hour-long TV series is in the works with CBS TV Studios, and will be ‘Mean Girls meets Riverdale meets a Lizzo music video’. We’re into it.

There is one pretty major catch, though: Cher won’t be present for the majority of the show. As if, we know.

That said, we’re excited to hear that it’ll be Dionne who takes centre stage (or screen) this time around, as Cher has *mYsTErIouSlY* disappeared.

The show will follow Dionne’s adjustment to being high school’s new ‘It Girl’ while simultaneously trying to solve her best friend’s strange disappearance, all set in modern day LA. Certainly very Riverdale, no?

Don’t know about you, but our interest is well and truly piqued. We’ll definitely be tuning in…

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Is this why Donald Trump and Melania don’t sleep in the same bed?

Is this why Donald Trump and Melania don’t sleep in the same bed?


We can’t really say we’re surprised…

getty images

Ever since becoming President, the world has been analysing Donald Trump’s every move, searching for any clues about his personal life and what on earth is going on behind the White House walls.

One of the most puzzling things about the President is his unconventional relationship with his wife, Melania Trump, who looked visibly unhappy throughout her husband’s inauguration and is often photographed with a frown.

Despite usually focusing on Donald Trump quotes, the whole world has instead been examining the couple’s body language recently, especially amid the speculation that Melania has been replaced by a lookalike body double.

Trump appears to avoid holding hands in public with the former Slovenian model, something that body language expert Patti Wood has described as very telling of their relationship. According to her, it’s all down to Trump wanting to be seen as an alpha male and leader, rather than as part of a unit.

The same reasoning could explain several aspects of the First Couple’s relationship, with Donald Trump and Melania reportedly sleeping in separate beds.

Of course the couple sometimes live miles apart, with many properties to their name. It has been suggested, however, that even when the couple are living in the same place –  the White House, they will share a bedroom but sleep in separate beds.

A source told Us Weekly that ‘it’s very “royal” of them’, alleging that the couple’s relationship has deteriorated since Trump became President, going on to explain that Melania feels ‘trapped’ in her new role.

‘She is not interested in Donald, the presidency or anything involving him’, another source reportedly told the magazine.

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Lucy Boynton: ‘When I was younger, I found it easier to be politically apathetic. Now, there's no excuse'

Lucy Boynton: ‘When I was younger, I found it easier to be politically apathetic. Now, there's no excuse'


From a star-making turn in Bohemian Rhapsody to a leading role in sassy new Netflix show The Politician, Lucy Boynton is ready for her close-up. Here, she tells Jane Mulkerrins about her life-changing year

Lucy Boynton

When Bohemian Rhapsody star Rami Malek closed his Best Actor acceptance speech at this year’s Oscars with a declaration of love for his co-star and girlfriend, no one was more surprised than the woman herself. ‘Lucy Boynton, you’re the heart of this film,’ he gushed. ‘You are beyond immensely talented. You have captured my heart.’

As anyone who has seen the phenomenally successful Queen biopic will attest, Malek is correct on both counts – because, while he might have had the glory of the lead role, Boynton’s portrayal of Freddie Mercury’s muse Mary Austin undoubtedly steals the show. If the 25-year-old American-English actress had been hoping for a quiet night at the Oscars, she would have been disappointed; by the end of the evening, several hundred million viewers in over 225 countries knew her name.

‘He specifically told me he wasn’t going to [mention me]!’ laughs Boynton when we meet in the lobby of the hip Manhattan hotel where she’s currently living with Malek. ‘Sitting front row, right in front of him, it felt like a very personal exchange. And then he walks offstage and there’s applause, and you suddenly realise you’ve shared it not only with an auditorium of people, but everyone watching on TV. I didn’t clock until everyone kept asking me about it. I’d be, like, “None of your business, you weren’t there. Oh, OK, you did see it, yes.”’

I bring it up not just because it feels like a significant moment in her flourishing career so far, but because, with any luck, it will be the last time Boynton plays ‘the girlfriend’ – on or off screen. This autumn sees her take centre stage with her first leading TV role in The Politician, the latest razor-sharp comedy drama series from Ryan Murphy (cult creator of American Crime Story, Feud and Pose). In another scene-stealing performance, Boynton plays Astrid, a Machiavellian high schooler with a wardrobe to die for.

When I first met Boynton a year ago, we talked at length about Mary Austin’s ‘evolved’ relationship with Freddie Mercury, since she remained his close friend and muse long after their romance ended and he embraced his true sexuality (albeit never formally coming out). So, it’s interesting that The Politician – in which Murphy and his co-creator Brad Falchuck (aka Mr Gwyneth Paltrow) have transplanted narratives surrounding presidential elections and debates about wealth, power, entitlement and privilege into a darkly comic high school drama – neatly takes the topic of sexual fluidity and non-conformity to a contemporary (if somewhat utopian) place.

‘The characters never have a conversation about their sexual orientation or gender identity,’ explains Boynton. While there are numerous same-sex relationships in the show – and lots of sex in general – they are never discussed or defined. ‘It’s a huge leap forward,’ she enthuses. ‘Obviously, these are important things to discuss, but the next step is that it doesn’t even need to be a discussion. No one needs to come out at the beginning of a show, being, like, “I’m THIS”.’

Lucy Boynton

If the zeitgeist content wasn’t appealing enough, The Politician also boasts a starry cast including Ben Platt, Jessica Lange, January Jones (who plays Astrid’s former prostitute mother) and Gwyneth Paltrow. ‘I didn’t meet her until we did press, so that was intimidating,’ admits Boynton. ‘But then you feel so stupid for having been intimidated, because you meet her and she’s so normal. And I hate the fact that “normal” just came out of my mouth, but you hold her to some other level and then she’s just really nice. And not sugary nice – brilliantly funny nice.’

‘Nice’ isn’t a word you’d use about any of the characters in The Politician. And in the parlance of real political elections, the privileged, glacial Astrid would certainly not pass the ‘likeability’ test. But labelling her the Mean Girl is to miss her complexity entirely. ‘The ways that she is bad or unappealing or unkind are so rooted in lessons that I think are very valuable for a young woman,’ nods Boynton. ‘Her parents have raised her to be a girl in that world and use her looks. But Dylan McDermott, who plays my father, is relentless in the way that he treats her, and I don’t think it would be any different if he had a son. There is this sense of ruthlessness, the idea that this world will eat you up if you let it, so how are you going to prepare?’

Boynton’s own feminism was formed in large part by her older sister, Emma. ‘When I was 17, [she] thought I wasn’t being enough of a feminist, so she gave me a book called C**t: A Declaration Of Independence,’ she tells me with a laugh, the provocative four-letter word sounding even more gloriously transgressive in her clipped RP. The seminal text by Inga Muscio is, she says, ‘all about how that word used to be associated with queens and female power, and was hijacked by men using it derogatorily, and how that then weighs on society.’

Lucy Boynton

Boynton’s portrayal of Astrid certainly gets the thumbs up from Emma. ‘She watched the first episode and was thrilled, because she knows I learned all of Astrid’s glaring and snarkiness from her.’

In spite of her cut-glass vowels, Boynton was born in New York. Her parents, Graham Boynton and Adriaane Pielou, are journalists who were working in the US at the time, and moved back to London when Lucy was five and Emma, six. Their profession has, she says, made her own itinerant career less of an issue. ‘All my relationships are long distance, but it’s something I’ve grown up with.’

I wonder how she’s finding living in the hotel she’s been based at for the last five months. ‘It’s thrilling at first; you feel like Eloise at the Plaza,’ she laughs. ‘But it never seems like your space. You start to feel as if you’re just on borrowed ground and borrowed time, which you are.’

Did they not consider renting an apartment? ‘It made sense at the time,’ she smiles, rolling her eyes. ‘Because we’re both back and forth all over the place.’ Malek, 38, is currently juggling shooting the new Bond film, in which he plays 007’s latest villainous adversary, and the final season of his award-winning hacker drama, Mr Robot, while Boynton spent the summer promoting The Politician in the US. ‘I’ve been feeling quite baseless for a couple of years now,’ she adds.

Lucy Boynton

Boynton attended the prestigious James Allen’s Girls’ School in London, where she was spotted at the age of 11 by a casting director who was visiting the school in the hope of finding a girl to play the young Beatrix Potter in the 2006 film Miss Potter. With no professional experience, she was cast alongside Renée Zellweger and Ewan McGregor.  ‘And once I got a taste for it, there was no way back,’ she explains.

Parts in the BBC adaptations of Ballet Shoes and Sense & Sensibility quickly followed. ‘I never did kids TV, so nothing I was doing ever felt child actor-y,’ she says. ‘My agent, who signed me at 11, and who I am still with, encouraged me to say no to a lot of things. It’s an industry that’s not guaranteed, and there is always the concern that if you say no too much, you might ‘no’ yourself out of the door. But she gave me a baseline of what to expect and what I should say yes to.’

After that came what she drily refers to as her ‘hiatus’. Turning 16, and deemed ‘too old for the kid roles and too young for adult roles’, coincided with ‘braces, bad skin, crap metabolism and school exams. I wasn’t even auditioning,’ she says. ‘Thank God that time [wasn’t] captured on camera.’

‘There were years of going to auditions pretty much every day and getting nothing,’ she recalls, of trying to pick up where she left off a couple of years later. ‘But it forced me to check myself and check I really wanted it.’ Eventually, the work rolled back in. She appeared in a couple of small films, before bagging more significant parts in Sing Street (2016) and Murder On The Orient Express (2017).

While we get our teeth into season one of The Politician, Boynton will be stepping back into Astrid’s brocade shifts and knee socks – twin-sets and diamonds for season two, which films over the next five months. As for future goals, ‘I’m trying to get involved in projects earlier on,’ she explains. ‘So, instead of just coming in and auditioning, helping develop what it will look like and sound like. I’ve been reading predominantly female authors with female protagonists, with an eye to developing them. It turns out most things are bought.’ Probably by Reese Witherspoon, we speculate. ‘I’m becoming more opinionated, and I don’t think I would have been able to try this any earlier in my career than right now,’ she says.

Perhaps less surprisingly, Boynton has become more engaged in political matters. ‘When I was younger, I found it easier to be politically apathetic. It always just felt very distant, not personal in any way. And, then, in the last few years, since Trump and Brexit, there’s no excuse,’ she says.

‘It affects everyone so deeply, and goes so far beyond just politics, into human-to-human respect, interaction and rights.’ As a US as well as UK citizen, she will, she adds, be fully exercising her right to vote in the 2020 presidential election. ‘You just can’t not be outraged, I think.’ Astrid would be proud.

The Politician is on Netflix now

Photograph by David Roemer; Styled by Jayne Pickering 

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Check your bookshelf – some copies of Harry Potter could be worth £28,000

Check your bookshelf – some copies of Harry Potter could be worth £28,000


harry potter
©2005 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Harry Potter Publishing Rights © J.K.R.

Ah, the 90s – the decade of Groovy Chick everything, smelly gel pens and Recess.

It seems that all the wonderful things from your childhood are worth a pretty penny these days. If you have still any of these rare Beanie Babies, they could make you seriously rich, and these old Disney VHS tapes are now worth thousands.

And if you still have your original copies of the Harry Potter books, you could be sitting on a fortune.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone first hit bookshelves in 1997, and first editions could be worth a lot.

One copy of the hardback is going to auction today, and the experts are predicting that it’ll sell for around £30,000. Only 500 original copies of the first edition Harry Potter book exist, making it very rare and very valuable. It’s reportedly in pristine condition, and while the owners originally intended to keep it as a family heirloom they’ve decided to sell.

By pristine condition, we mean that they went to extreme lengths to keep it looking brand new. It was tucked away in a code-locked suitcase to ensure that it stayed perfectly clean and crisp, and has remained untouched for years.

The couple who are selling this absolute wonder are auctioning the book of anonymously, and said: ‘It’s been locked away in a briefcase along with a first edition of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets which is also up for auction.

‘The plan was to keep them as family heirlooms, which is why my wife put them in a briefcase. It was to stop the pages turning yellow.’

Jim Spencer of Hansons Auctioneers revealed that a similar copy sold in July this year for £28,000, saying: ‘A 1997 first edition hardback of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone is the holy grail for collectors as so few were printed. To find another one so soon after the July sale has knocked my socks off.

‘The owners took such great care of their precious cargo they brought it to me in a briefcase, which they unlocked with a code.

‘I couldn’t believe the condition of it – almost like the day it was made. I can’t imagine a better copy can be found. Only 500 copies of the true first impression hardback were printed, 300 of which were sent to libraries and schools.

‘This new discovery is scarcer than the previous find, which was a former Staffordshire library book. It deserves to fetch much more.’

It’ll be auctioned alongside 11 more Harry Potter first editions, including one signed by J. K. Rowling herself.

Better check your bookshelf immediately.

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Two students have filed a sexual exploitation lawsuit against James Franco

Two students have filed a sexual exploitation lawsuit against James Franco


Getty Images

It was reported this week that James Franco is being sued for sexual exploitation and fraud.

The 41-year-old actor has come under fire for his now closed acting school Studio 4, with two of his former acting students, Sarah Tither-Kaplan and Toni Gaal, claiming that Franco had created ‘an environment of harassment and sexual exploitation’.

‘[Mr. Franco and his partners] engaged in widespread inappropriate and sexually charged behaviour towards female students by sexualising their power as a teacher and an employer by dangling the opportunity for roles in their projects,’ reads the lawsuit, per the New York Times.

Recalling her experience, the LA school’s former student Toni Gaal alleged that the sex scenes classes were only available to those who auditioned on film for Franco, with reports that the rights to the said recordings were signed away.

Toni Gaal was reportedly denied entry to the class after voicing her concerns but Sarah Tither-Kaplan went on to claim that during an orgy scene, Franco apparently got rid of the genital guards used to cover the actress’ genitals while they simulated oral sex.

While they are making viral news this week, the allegations were first made in 2018 after actresses came forward with their accusations during the Time’s Up movement.

‘Hey James Franco, nice #timesup pin at the #GoldenGlobes,’ Sarah Tither-Kaplan tweeted the actor to voice her claims. ‘Remember a few weeks ago when you told me the full nudity you had me do in two of your movies for $100/day wasn’t exploitative because I signed a contract to do it? Times up on that!’

‘I pride myself on taking responsibility for things that I have done,’ the Disaster Artist actor explained on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert at the time. ‘But the things that I’ve heard that were on Twitter are not accurate, but I completely support people coming out and being able to have a voice, because they didn’t have a voice for so long.’

James Franco has not yet responded since the claims have resurfaced.

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Stu Heritage: ‘Why I’m raising my sons to be the very best feminists’

Stu Heritage: ‘Why I’m raising my sons to be the very best feminists’


Author and Guardian columnist, Stuart Heritage, lays down the ground rules on toxic masculinity and championing women for his sons in a post #metoo era

Stu Heritage

Words by Stuart Heritage

Hello! If you’re anything like me, you’ll be waking up in the middle of night worrying about climate change, plastic pollution and why the world is such a horrible place. I’ve just written a book called Bedtime Stories for Worried Liberals, a collection of short funny stories about this. One of the stories is called The Man Who Couldn’t Even Hug Anyone Any More, about a middle-aged white man (well, I’m 39 now) struggling to adapt in a post #MeToo world. While writing, I realised that traditional masculinity is responsible for a huge slice of the world’s ills. So, here’s my letter to my two young sons, about how I’d like them to grow up…

Dear sons,

I’m sorry. This is all my fault. Had you been born at literally any other point in human history, you would have had the run of the place by now. As a pair of boys – and relatively white boys at that – the whole world has always been purpose built for your needs from the ground up.

Seriously, it was crazy what people like us used to get away with. We had all the money and all the power. If we wanted to go around groping women, we could. If we wanted to go out to work and leave our wives to stay at home and raise the kids, we could. Get this: if we wanted to own a new country, we used to just find one and tell everyone that it was ours. We did it all the time! And people actually let us! Isn’t that nuts? This is the world you could have been born into.

But no. I met your mum too late, and you were born too late, and now that’s all disappeared. We live in a post #MeToo world now, and I’m afraid to say that they’re on to us. You’re the first generation of men in history who won’t get to swan around doing whatever they like without fear of reprisal. I know. It’s my fault. I’m sorry.

Stu Heritage

 

This basically leaves you with two options. The first is to rail against your predicament, spluttering that equality is a sign of political correctness gone mad and that white men are actually now the real minority. I’d advise against this, though, on the basis that it’ll make you look like a right tit. Your other choice, however, is to try and figure out how to be good, strong, considerate men in the world. Hopefully your mother and I have already shown you how to do this. But here’s a reminder, just in case:

  1. Don’t be afraid to talk

Being a man can suck sometimes. Our role models have always been strong and silent. We’re taught to push our feelings all the way down to the pit of our stomach. We’re told to ‘man up’. And this is devastating. If we don’t talk about it, all our sadness and frustration at the world will have nowhere to go, and it ends up coming out in horrible ways. Sometimes it makes us hurt other people. Sometimes it makes us hurt ourselves. You’ve seen me swear at strangers in the car before, so you can probably see I’ve still got some work to do in this area. But I want you both to know that you can talk to me about your feelings. I’m always going to be here for you.

  1. Stick up for yourself

You are both such beautiful, weird, tender little boys. I’m proud of how thoughtful and sensitive you are, and I never want you stop being yourselves. But the day is bound to come when men will start bullying you to be more like them. Maybe they’ll take against your all-consuming infatuation with bowhead whales. Maybe they’ll knock the books out of your hands and tease you for not liking sport. This happened to me, and I ended up caving in to their demands; my entire school life was essentially spent pretending to understand football. I’d love for you to be able to do better than me. You don’t need to bow to the rigid demands of masculinity. You can like anything you want to like. You can wear whatever you want to wear. You can love whoever you want to love. Stick up for yourselves. Be better than me. And, if you can’t be better than me, do what I do and use Facebook to see how badly all your old classmates have screwed up their lives. It’s a lot of fun, I promise.

Stu Heritage

  1. Try to lead by example

This is a big one. If I believe anything at all, it’s this. Instagram is full of people who think the best way to teach a three-year-old how to be decent is to photograph them holding a book about feminism that was written for 15-year-olds. It’s infuriating. That isn’t how children learn. They learn by watching and mimicking their role models. When you both grow up to be decent men, I hope that it’ll be in part because you saw me trying my hardest to be a good man. There are studies showing that children with engaged fathers have better cognitive development and more satisfactory relationships. Just by watching me cook dinner every night, for example, you’re subconsciously learning not to believe in traditional gender roles. You’ll grow up smart and self-reliant, and less likely to push the burden of emotional labour onto your partners. And your kids, if you have them, will see you doing it and they’ll grow up to be even better than you. This is how change works. I guess what I’m trying to say – and I want you to read this slowly, so it really sinks in – is that I’m pretty bloody amazing

  1. Be brave

As I write this, you’re both incredibly into superheroes. You call them ‘brave heroes’, which is actually quite adorable. But try to remember that superheroes aren’t brave. Batman isn’t brave; he’s a bored billionaire with nothing to live for. The Hulk isn’t brave; he’s just strong and stupid. Superman isn’t brave; he’s literally an invincible godhead from another planet. To truly be brave is to feel sad or scared, but find the strength to carry on anyway. You’re both already so brave: you were brave on your first day of nursery, and on your first day of school, and when you shouted down the bigger boys who pushed you at soft play, and when you saw that dead crab on the beach that time. If you can keep this spirit of bravery alive within you for your entire life then, my god, you’ll turn out to be great men.

  1. Don’t send pictures of your dicks to strangers

I mean, you’d think that this one is just common sense. But it bears repeating. Do not, under any circumstances, send a picture of your dick to a stranger on the internet. It’s weird and gross. Final warning.

I love you both so much

Dad

PS. I swear to god, though, if you’re still waking me up at four thirty every morning when you read this, I’m cutting you out of my will.

Stu’s book Bedtime Stories For Worried Liberals, is out Thur 3 Oct, £7.19 (hardback)  on Amazon – normal RRP £9.99, published by Profile

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Angelina Jolie questioned whether she was a good enough mother

Angelina Jolie questioned whether she was a good enough mother


Getty images

Angelina Jolie is one of the most talked-about women in the world, making viral news for everything from her new Marvel role to her separation from Brad Pitt, with the couple finally announced to be single this year (three years after filing for divorce), choosing to ‘bifurcate’ their marriage.

It’s her role as mother however that has made the most news this week, with the 44-year-old never missing an opportunity to talk proudly about her children.

Ange’s 18-year-old son Maddox is currently studying biochemistry at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, something that has made a lot of news this past few months, with the actress recalling how she ‘ugly cried’ as she dropped him off at his university dormitory.

This week, Angelina took her five other children – Pax, Zahara, Knox, Vivienne and Shiloh, along with her to the LA premiere of her new film Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. And taking to the red carpet to talk about her character, Angelina opened up about her own experiences of becoming a mother.

‘I questioned when I was a mother if I was good enough’, the actress explained.

This has to be the most relatable motherhood fear of all time.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil comes to UK cinemas on 18 October.

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Prince Harry: 'I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces'

Prince Harry: 'I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces'


Prince Harry’s statement about Meghan Markle being bullied is heartbreaking

Getty Images

Since becoming a royal, Meghan Markle has suffered an endless stream of online abuse, from mum shaming and body shaming comments to being the subject of vicious rumours.

On Tuesday, the Duchess of Sussex took action, taking legal action against the Mail on Sunday after the tabloid had published a private letter that she had written to her father, Thomas Markle.

Following the action, Prince Harry issued a public statement on his concerns for his wife and his fears of history repeating itself, with his mother Princess Diana suffering the same abuse.

‘As a couple, we believe in media freedom and objective, truthful reporting. We regard it as a cornerstone of democracy and in the current state of the world – on every level – we have never needed responsible media more,’ the statement read. ‘Unfortunately, my wife has become one of the latest victims of a British tabloid press that wages campaigns against individuals with no thought to the consequences – a ruthless campaign that has escalated over the past year, throughout her pregnancy and while raising our newborn son.

‘There is a human cost to this relentless propaganda, specifically when it is knowingly false and malicious, and though we have continued to put on a brave face – as so many of you can relate to – I cannot begin to describe how painful it has been. Because in today’s digital age, press fabrications are repurposed as truth across the globe. One day’s coverage is no longer tomorrow’s chip-paper.

View this post on Instagram

Following our tradition of rotating the accounts we follow on a monthly basis, for the month of October we are celebrating “community.” • Over the last week on their official tour to Southern Africa, The Duke and Duchess have had a poignant reminder of the importance of community – the sense of support and togetherness that is felt from feeling like you are a part of something that respects difference but also celebrates shared values for the greater good. Please let us know the favourite organisation in your community – one you enjoy volunteering for, or that makes you proud to be a part of – one that supports you personally in your everyday life, and that defines what you feel community is all about. Based on your suggestions we will then choose our new accounts to follow for October. Thanks so much and thanks for being a part of the Sussex community! Photo © High Commission

A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal) on Oct 1, 2019 at 9:23am PDT

‘Up to now, we have been unable to correct the continual misrepresentations – something that these select media outlets have been aware of and have therefore exploited on a daily and sometimes hourly basis.’

The statement continued: ‘It is for this reason we are taking legal action, a process that has been many months in the making. The positive coverage of the past week from these same publications exposes the double standards of this specific press pack that has vilified her almost daily for the past nine months; they have been able to create lie after lie at her expense simply because she has not been visible while on maternity leave. She is the same woman she was a year ago on our wedding day, just as she is the same woman you’ve seen on this Africa tour.

‘For these select media this is a game, and one that we have been unwilling to play from the start. I have been a silent witness to her private suffering for too long. To stand back and do nothing would be contrary to everything we believe in.

‘This particular legal action hinges on one incident in a long and disturbing pattern of behaviour by British tabloid media. The contents of a private letter were published unlawfully in an intentionally destructive manner to manipulate you, the reader, and further the divisive agenda of the media group in question. In addition to their unlawful publication of this private document, they purposely misled you by strategically omitting select paragraphs, specific sentences, and even singular words to mask the lies they had perpetuated for over a year.

‘There comes a point when the only thing to do is to stand up to this behaviour, because it destroys people and destroys lives. Put simply, it is bullying, which scares and silences people. We all know this isn’t acceptable, at any level. We won’t and can’t believe in a world where there is no accountability for this.

Concluding the statement, Prince Harry wrote: ‘Though this action may not be the safe one, it is the right one. Because my deepest fear is history repeating itself. I’ve seen what happens when someone I love is commoditised to the point that they are no longer treated or seen as a real person. I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces.

‘We thank you, the public, for your continued support. It is hugely appreciated. Although it may not seem like it, we really need it.’

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Stu Heritage: ‘I’m raising my sons to be the very best feminists’

Stu Heritage: ‘I’m raising my sons to be the very best feminists’


Author and Guardian columnist Stuart Heritage knows all too well how toxic masculinity has had a detrimental effect on women’s fight for gender equality, freedom from sexual harassment and women’s rights. So he’s laying down the ground rules for his sons as they grow up in a post #metoo world

Stu Heritage

Words by Stuart Heritage

Hello! If you’re anything like me, you’ll be waking up in the middle of night worrying about climate change, plastic pollution and why the world is such a horrible place. I’ve just written a book called Bedtime Stories for Worried Liberals, a collection of short funny stories about this. One of the stories is called The Man Who Couldn’t Even Hug Anyone Any More, about a middle-aged white man (well, I’m 39 now) struggling to adapt in a post #MeToo world. While writing, I realised that traditional masculinity is responsible for a huge slice of the world’s ills. So, here’s my letter to my two young sons, about how I’d like them to grow up…

Dear sons,

I’m sorry. This is all my fault. Had you been born at literally any other point in human history, you would have had the run of the place by now. As a pair of boys – and relatively white boys at that – the whole world has always been purpose built for your needs from the ground up.

Seriously, it was crazy what people like us used to get away with. We had all the money and all the power. If we wanted to go around groping women, we could. If we wanted to go out to work and leave our wives to stay at home and raise the kids, we could. Get this: if we wanted to own a new country, we used to just find one and tell everyone that it was ours. We did it all the time! And people actually let us! Isn’t that nuts? This is the world you could have been born into.

But no. I met your mum too late, and you were born too late, and now that’s all disappeared. We live in a post #MeToo world now, and I’m afraid to say that they’re on to us. You’re the first generation of men in history who won’t get to swan around doing whatever they like without fear of reprisal. I know. It’s my fault. I’m sorry.

Stu Heritage

This basically leaves you with two options. The first is to rail against your predicament, spluttering that equality is a sign of political correctness gone mad and that white men are actually now the real minority. I’d advise against this, though, on the basis that it’ll make you look like a right tit. Your other choice, however, is to try and figure out how to be good, strong, considerate men in the world. Hopefully your mother and I have already shown you how to do this. But here’s a reminder, just in case:

  1. Don’t be afraid to talk

Being a man can suck sometimes. Our role models have always been strong and silent. We’re taught to push our feelings all the way down to the pit of our stomach. We’re told to ‘man up’. And this is devastating. If we don’t talk about it, all our sadness and frustration at the world will have nowhere to go, and it ends up coming out in horrible ways. Sometimes it makes us hurt other people. Sometimes it makes us hurt ourselves. You’ve seen me swear at strangers in the car before, so you can probably see I’ve still got some work to do in this area. But I want you both to know that you can talk to me about your feelings. I’m always going to be here for you.

  1. Stick up for yourself

You are both such beautiful, weird, tender little boys. I’m proud of how thoughtful and sensitive you are, and I never want you stop being yourselves. But the day is bound to come when men will start bullying you to be more like them. Maybe they’ll take against your all-consuming infatuation with bowhead whales. Maybe they’ll knock the books out of your hands and tease you for not liking sport. This happened to me, and I ended up caving in to their demands; my entire school life was essentially spent pretending to understand football. I’d love for you to be able to do better than me. You don’t need to bow to the rigid demands of masculinity. You can like anything you want to like. You can wear whatever you want to wear. You can love whoever you want to love. Stick up for yourselves. Be better than me. And, if you can’t be better than me, do what I do and use Facebook to see how badly all your old classmates have screwed up their lives. It’s a lot of fun, I promise.

  1. Try to lead by example

This is a big one. If I believe anything at all, it’s this. Instagram is full of people who think the best way to teach a three-year-old how to be decent is to photograph them holding a book about feminism that was written for 15-year-olds. It’s infuriating. That isn’t how children learn. They learn by watching and mimicking their role models. When you both grow up to be decent men, I hope that it’ll be in part because you saw me trying my hardest to be a good man. There are studies showing that children with engaged fathers have better cognitive development and more satisfactory relationships. Just by watching me cook dinner every night, for example, you’re subconsciously learning not to believe in traditional gender roles. You’ll grow up smart and self-reliant, and less likely to push the burden of emotional labour onto your partners. And your kids, if you have them, will see you doing it and they’ll grow up to be even better than you. This is how change works. I guess what I’m trying to say – and I want you to read this slowly, so it really sinks in – is that I’m pretty bloody amazing

  1. Be brave

As I write this, you’re both incredibly into superheroes. You call them ‘brave heroes’, which is actually quite adorable. But try to remember that superheroes aren’t brave. Batman isn’t brave; he’s a bored billionaire with nothing to live for. The Hulk isn’t brave; he’s just strong and stupid. Superman isn’t brave; he’s literally an invincible godhead from another planet. To truly be brave is to feel sad or scared, but find the strength to carry on anyway. You’re both already so brave: you were brave on your first day of nursery, and on your first day of school, and when you shouted down the bigger boys who pushed you at soft play, and when you saw that dead crab on the beach that time. If you can keep this spirit of bravery alive within you for your entire life then, my god, you’ll turn out to be great men.

  1. Don’t send pictures of your dicks to strangers

I mean, you’d think that this one is just common sense. But it bears repeating. Do not, under any circumstances, send a picture of your dick to a stranger on the internet. It’s weird and gross. Final warning.

I love you both so much

Dad

PS. I swear to god, though, if you’re still waking me up at four thirty every morning when you read this, I’m cutting you out of my will.

Stu’s book Bedtime Stories For Worried Liberals, is out Thur 3 Oct, £7.19 (hardback)  on Amazon – normal RRP £9.99, published by Profile

The post Stu Heritage: ‘I’m raising my sons to be the very best feminists’ appeared first on Marie Claire.

Victoria and Harper Beckham enjoy doing their make up together at home

Victoria and Harper Beckham enjoy doing their make up together at home


But not outside of the house, according to VB.

Getty Images

Victoria Beckham wears a hell of a lot of hats, making us all feel like under achievers in comparison on the regular.

The former Spice Girl is a fashion designer and businesswoman, with a buzzing YouTube channel, multiple sellout skincare lines and a lot of charity work under her belt.

Oh and let’s not forget that her main priority is being a hands-on mother of four to her children, Brooklyn, Romeo, Cruz and Harper.

Just look at the front row of her SS20 fashion show at LFW last month, with all four of her children and husband David Beckham showing their support.

It was Harper Beckham that has been making the most news however, with Victoria recently opening up about how she is bringing her daughter up with an emphasis on being kind to other girls.

This week, VB opened up about her daughter once more, explaining how the two like to play with make up together, but making it clear that her youngest would not be wearing make up outside of the house.

‘Harper’s really girly so we do enjoy make up at home,’ Victoria revealed in an interview with This Morning, via HELLO!. ’I mean, she wouldn’t go out of the house with make up on obviously, but I think it’s a really nice thing you can do with your daughter, you know. Play with make up and have fun.’

The interview aired on This Morning on 1 October.

The post Victoria and Harper Beckham enjoy doing their make up together at home appeared first on Marie Claire.